Critique of the Iphone 3G’s Voicemail Interface

*screenshot of iphone 3G's voicemail

*screenshot of iphone 3G

The iPhone’s voicemail interface to make it easier to check messages visually for the user.  The screen starting from the top shows the user how many new voicemails they have by putting the number in parentheses.  The option for user to customize their is left of the voicemail heading and to listen to the voicemail on speaker phone is to the right of the heading.  Above the voicemail heading displays the time of day, battery power, and strength of signal.  The blue dots that are left of the callers name also shows what voicemails that are new, and what time they were left.  The user can listen to the message by tapping on the name of the caller.  The arrows that are right of the time the messages were received can be tapped once to receive more info about the caller.  In the lower third of the interface the iPhone producers made it available for the user to fast forward and rewind through a message visually.  This is intended for the user to catch the important information for the message without having to listen to the whole thing again and again.  At the bottom as well there is the option to call the person back or delete the message itself.  Finally at the bottom of the screen there is other menus the user can access while being on this interface.  In the bottom right hang corner there is a voicemail icon with a red dot. The red dot annotates how many new unlistened to message there are in the inbox.

This interface was intended to make a more pleasent and easy way for the user to be able to receive there messages.  The interface does a good job of organizing the screen for the user to read the information from top to bottom.  The big font that reads “Voicemail” helps the user now exactly what screen they are on.  The parentheses also help the user know how many messages that are new.  The names of the callers are well organized by name and time, but the blue dots and arrows may leave a first time user confused about what their intended functions are.  The majority of the phone’s operations are ran by the user tapping the screen to perform its’ intended use.   The user should be able to “connect the dots” from the number that’s annotated in parentheses, and the number of blue dots to know those are the new messages.  The user can listen to those new messages as well as old messages just by tapping on the name of the caller.  A user can tell by the looks of the interface the message highlighted in blue is the message they are currenlty listening to.  Also when the caller’s name is highlighted, the user can see the length of the message, and options for what user may want to do with the message.  The blue arrows maybe the part of this interface that could be very confusing to the user.  It’s not exactly clear just by looking at the arrows what they are there for.  The shortcut menus at the bottom of the interface are clearly labled with text and icons for the user.  This interface could negate foreign speakers and readers because all the text is in English and it read from left to right.  I’m not sure if they accounted for this when selling to foreigners in English speaking countries and all over the world.  Overall, the iPhone’s voicemail interface seems like a smooth design, but it would take some time for the user to get adjusted this new way of doing there voicemail.

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One Response to “Critique of the Iphone 3G’s Voicemail Interface”

  1. lynndombrowski Says:

    “The blue dots that are left of the callers name also shows what voicemails that are new, and what time they were left. “ “In the lower third of the interface the iPhone producers made it available for the user to fast forward and rewind through a message visually.”
    – That is very useful, I don’t know of any other phone that does that.

    Nice critique.


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