Group cognitive account on Digg.com

Attention: When a new user first visits digg.com their attention is drawn to the tool bar at the top of the page first as well as the long lost of articles on the left side. The search bar and podcast button also draw the attention of the user. The site does a good job of drawing attention to popular features and articles as well as makes them easy to use.

Perception: Digg.com relies heavily on headlines and tabs to distinguish articles and article categories respectively. The tabs are clearly labeled and easy to read and the headlines are large and bold which helps tremendously when searching for articles. This layout works well for quickly finding an article that would be interesting to the user. It also has a unique feature called “diggs” that allows users to vote on articles. The more “diggs” an article has the more popular.

Memory: Digg.com is a very easy site to use therefore there is not much to remember. As long as the user can remember the tabs and the search bar he or she can maneuver through the site with ease.

Learning: Digg.com is very easy to learn. Joining the site is easy as well all it takes is one click and a short, non personal registration page. The site may seem cluttered at first glance but once the user begins to interact the site becomes very self explanatory and user friendly.

Problem Solving/ Decision making: Digg.com does a great job of making functions easy to find and understand. It also provides a few helpful tools at the bottom of the home page. These tools may be better placed at the top of the website for new users who may not be very computer savvy.

Digg.com, and we’re sure other sites like it, are inherently unbiased. The site itself
isn’t the one creating the content and its top “diggs” are completely based on the users
themselves. If anything, this makes it seem like digg.com caters to the popular opinion.
The sites that are viewed the most are the ones with the most “diggs”. The sites with the
most “diggs” are usually the sites with obvious bias one way or the other. Just looking
right now at “digg’s” “US Elections 2008” section, the top 2 “digged” sites are “SNL SKEWERS McCain and His Sleazy Lies” and “Why McCain is Wrong on Healthcare.” Needless to say, these could easily affect a person’s decision-making behaviors. I’m sure the site caters to both sides as both Obama and McCain supporters will view the site, but it looks like this would definitely be one place where a person can go to back up their opinions on someone or bash other people’s opposing views.

Overall Digg.com is a great news site that provides the user with good visual appeal and an easily learned layout.

(Whoever has the second web site’s cognitive account please post it before 5:00 today)

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One Response to “Group cognitive account on Digg.com”

  1. lynndombrowski Says:

    Nice job,

    The only comment I have, is are you folks sure that you can make this claim: “Digg.com, and we’re sure other sites like it, are inherently unbiased.”.

    Is the digg site free of bias?
    (I’m not looking for a particular answer, I’m just curious what people are thinking.)


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